Coat of Arms

Coat of Arms of the Diocese

The Coat of Arms of the Diocese of San Jose displays symbols showing California roots, the Santa Clara Valley and the City of San Jose; a diagonal band of Latin crosses represents the missionary tradition of the area (21 California Missions) of which Santa Clara de Asis (1777) is one.  Symbols also represent the Archdiocese of San Francisco from which the Diocese of San Jose was founded in 1981; the rose, emblem of Mary (Our Lady of Guadalupe); a carpenter’s square represents the diocese’s patron, St. Joseph; and mountains represent the Santa Clara Valley.

Coat of Arms of Bishop DuMainearms1

This Coat of Arms of Bishop Emeritus Pierre DuMaine reflects both his personal Coat of Arms (right side) and that of the Diocese of San Jose (left), which he adopted as the first bishop of the diocese in 1981. His personal Coat of Arms depicts symbols of his parents’ cultural heritage; the Archdiocese of San Francisco where he was ordained and served; his patron the Apostle Peter who was martyred on an inverted cross; the Pacific Ocean and airwaves (reflecting his work in educational television and communications); and water symbols reminiscent of his youth in Kentucky near the Ohio and Cumberland Rivers. His Episcopal motto, “Gaudium et Spes,” reflects the opening words of the Second Vatican Council’s Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World:  “The joys and hopes, the grief and anguish of the people of our time, especially of those who are poor or afflicted, are the joys and hopes, the grief and anguish of the followers of Christ as well…”

Coat of Arms of Bishop Patrick J. McGrath

arms2

This is the original personal Coat of Arms of Bishop Patrick J. McGrath, when he became a bishop. (As second Bishop of San Jose, half of his Coat of Arms now would reflect the Coat of Arms of the Diocese of San Jose as well.) His personal Coat of Arms reflects a design that tells the history and heritage of his life and family – his roots in Ireland, his call to the priesthood and to the episcopacy; his studies in Ireland and Rome; and the French heritage of his mother.
His Episcopal motto, “Together in Christ,” expresses the main theme of the 12th chapter of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians – that all people, regardless of race or ethnic origin, are brothers and sisters in the work of humankind and of salvation.